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APOD: 2019 January 19 - Total Lunar Eclipse at Moonset




The Moon slid through Earth's shadow on January 31, 2018 in a total lunar eclipse. In this time-lapse sequence of that eclipse from Portal, Arizona, USA, the partial eclipse starts with the Moon high in the western sky. The eclipse total phase lasted about 76 minutes, but totality ended after the dark, reddened Moon set below the horizon. The upcoming total lunar eclipse, on the night of January 20/21, will be better placed for skygazers across the Americas, though. There, all 62 minutes of the total phase, when the Moon is completely immersed in Earth's dark umbral shadow, will take place with the Moon above the horizon. Watch it if you can. The next total lunar eclipse visible from anywhere on planet Earth won't take place until May 26, 2021, and then the total eclipse will last a mere 15 minutes.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190119.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
APOD: 2019 January 19 - Total Lunar Eclipse at Moonset




The Moon slid through Earth's shadow on January 31, 2018 in a total lunar eclipse. In this time-lapse sequence of that eclipse from Portal, Arizona, USA, the partial eclipse starts with the Moon high in the western sky. The eclipse total phase lasted about 76 minutes, but totality ended after the dark, reddened Moon set below the horizon. The upcoming total lunar eclipse, on the night of January 20/21, will be better placed for skygazers across the Americas, though. There, all 62 minutes of the total phase, when the Moon is completely immersed in Earth's dark umbral shadow, will take place with the Moon above the horizon. Watch it if you can. The next total lunar eclipse visible from anywhere on planet Earth won't take place until May 26, 2021, and then the total eclipse will last a mere 15 minutes.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190119.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 

Total lunar eclipse


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

How to watch and take pictures of Monday's total lunar eclipse
posted by pod_feeder

 

Total lunar eclipse


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

How to watch and take pictures of Monday's total lunar eclipse
posted by pod_feeder

 

ExoMars software passes ESA Mars Yard driving test


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

Navigation software destined for the ExoMars 2020 mission to the Red Planet has passed a rover-based driving test at ESA’s ‘Mars Yard’.
posted by pod_feeder

 

What is Space19+?


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

ESA Web TV talks with DG Jan Wörner to learn more about ‘Space19+’, ESA’s next Ministerial Council, and its benefits for citizens
posted by pod_feeder

 

Our Solar System's Formation Was A Lot Messier Than You Think - The Crux


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2019/01/16/solar-system-formation-chaos/

#space #solar system
Our Solar System’s Formation Was A Lot Messier Than You Think

 

Our Solar System's Formation Was A Lot Messier Than You Think - The Crux


http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2019/01/16/solar-system-formation-chaos/

#space #solar system
Our Solar System’s Formation Was A Lot Messier Than You Think

 

How much do we think we know about space?


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

Europeans are undeniably interested in space activities, and the idea of pooling resources between European countries is considered important unanimously by European citizens: just two of the fascinating findings from a recent survey of public perceptions of issues related to space.
posted by pod_feeder

 
#space #astronomy #universe #physics #astrophysics

 

Infrared Titan


#esa #europeanspaceagency #science #space

Image/photo

Space Science Image of the Week: How Saturn’s moon Titan looks in infrared
posted by pod_feeder

 

Infrared Titan


#esa #europeanspaceagency #science #space

Image/photo

Space Science Image of the Week: How Saturn’s moon Titan looks in infrared
posted by pod_feeder

 
APOD: 2019 January 13 - Tychos Supernova Remnant in Xray




What star created this huge puffball? What's pictured is the hot expanding nebula of Tycho's supernova remnant, the result of a stellar explosion first recorded over 400 years ago by the famous astronomer Tycho Brahe. The featured image is a composite of three X-ray colors taken by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. The expanding gas cloud is extremely hot, while slightly different expansion speeds have given the cloud a puffy appearance. Although the star that created SN 1572, is likely completely gone, a star dubbed Tycho G, too dim to be discerned here, is thought to be a companion. Finding progenitor remnants of Tycho's supernova is particularly important because the supernova is of Type Ia, an important rung in the distance ladder that calibrates the scale of the visible universe. The peak brightness of Type Ia supernovas is thought to be well understood, making them quite valuable in exploring the relationship between faintness and farness in the distant universe.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190113.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
APOD: 2019 January 13 - Tychos Supernova Remnant in Xray




What star created this huge puffball? What's pictured is the hot expanding nebula of Tycho's supernova remnant, the result of a stellar explosion first recorded over 400 years ago by the famous astronomer Tycho Brahe. The featured image is a composite of three X-ray colors taken by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. The expanding gas cloud is extremely hot, while slightly different expansion speeds have given the cloud a puffy appearance. Although the star that created SN 1572, is likely completely gone, a star dubbed Tycho G, too dim to be discerned here, is thought to be a companion. Finding progenitor remnants of Tycho's supernova is particularly important because the supernova is of Type Ia, an important rung in the distance ladder that calibrates the scale of the visible universe. The peak brightness of Type Ia supernovas is thought to be well understood, making them quite valuable in exploring the relationship between faintness and farness in the distant universe.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190113.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 

Week in images


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

Our week through the lens:

7 - 11 January 2019
posted by pod_feeder

 
APOD: 2019 January 11 - Partial Eclipse over Beijing




On January 6 the New Moon rose in silhouette with the Sun seen from northeastern Asia. Near maximum, the dramatic partial solar eclipse is captured in this telephoto view through hazy skies. In the foreground, the hill top Wanchun pavilion overlooking central Beijing's popular Forbidden City hosts eclipse-watching early morning risers. This was the first of five, three solar and two lunar, eclipses for 2019. Next up is a total lunar eclipse during this month's Full Perigee Moon. At night on January 21, that celestial shadow play will be visible from the hemisphere of planet Earth that includes the Americas, Europe, and western Africa.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190111.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
APOD: 2019 January 11 - Partial Eclipse over Beijing




On January 6 the New Moon rose in silhouette with the Sun seen from northeastern Asia. Near maximum, the dramatic partial solar eclipse is captured in this telephoto view through hazy skies. In the foreground, the hill top Wanchun pavilion overlooking central Beijing's popular Forbidden City hosts eclipse-watching early morning risers. This was the first of five, three solar and two lunar, eclipses for 2019. Next up is a total lunar eclipse during this month's Full Perigee Moon. At night on January 21, that celestial shadow play will be visible from the hemisphere of planet Earth that includes the Americas, Europe, and western Africa.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190111.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 

Team of telescopes finds X-ray engine inside mysterious supernova


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

ESA’s high-energy space telescopes Integral and XMM-Newton have helped to find a source of powerful X-rays at the centre of an unprecedentedly bright and rapidly evolving stellar explosion that suddenly appeared in the sky earlier this year.
posted by pod_feeder

 
"essentially crystal spheres in the sky"

Nature is so cool...


#space #astronomy #universe #physics #astrophysics

 

Cold Turkey


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

While snow continues to cause chaos in Austria and Germany, the cold snap has also reached Turkey as shown in this Copernicus Sentinel-3 image
posted by pod_feeder

 
#space #astronomy #universe #physics #astrophysics

 
#space #astronomy #universe #physics #astrophysics

 

Galilean Moons


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space




Galileo found Jupiter's four biggest moons 409 years ago. Take a closer look at his discovery with the new collection in the ESAshop and get a cosmic deal.
posted by pod_feeder

 

XMM-Newton captures final cries of star shredded by black hole


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

Astronomers using ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory have studied a black hole devouring a star and discovered an exceptionally bright and stable signal that allowed them to determine the black hole’s spin rate.
posted by pod_feeder

 

Gaia reveals how Sun-like stars turn solid after their demise


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

Data captured by ESA’s galaxy-mapping spacecraft Gaia has revealed for the first time how white dwarfs, the dead remnants of stars like our Sun, turn into solid spheres as the hot gas inside them cools down.
posted by pod_feeder

 

World-first chameleon satellite leaving native British shores


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

The last component of British-built chameleon satellite, Eutelsat Quantum, is getting ready to leave home for good.
posted by pod_feeder

 
APOD: 2019 January 9 - Quadrantids




Named for a forgotten constellation, the Quadrantid Meteor Shower is an annual event for planet Earth's northern hemisphere skygazers It usually peaks briefly in the cold, early morning hours of January 4. The shower's radiant on the sky lies within the old, astronomically obsolete constellation Quadrans Muralis. That position is situated near the boundaries of the modern constellations Hercules, Bootes, and Draco. About 30 Quadrantid meteors can be counted in this skyscape composed of digital frames recorded in dark and moonless skies between 2:30am and local dawn. The shower's radiant is rising just to the right of the Canary Island of Tenerife's Teide volcano, and just below the familiar stars of the Big Dipper on the northern sky. A likely source of the dust stream that produces Quadrantid meteors was identified in 2003 as an asteroid. Look carefully and you can also spot a small, telltale greenish coma above the volcanic peak and near the top of the frame. That's the 2018 Christmas visitor to planet Earth's skies, Comet Wirtanen.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190109.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
APOD: 2019 January 9 - Quadrantids




Named for a forgotten constellation, the Quadrantid Meteor Shower is an annual event for planet Earth's northern hemisphere skygazers It usually peaks briefly in the cold, early morning hours of January 4. The shower's radiant on the sky lies within the old, astronomically obsolete constellation Quadrans Muralis. That position is situated near the boundaries of the modern constellations Hercules, Bootes, and Draco. About 30 Quadrantid meteors can be counted in this skyscape composed of digital frames recorded in dark and moonless skies between 2:30am and local dawn. The shower's radiant is rising just to the right of the Canary Island of Tenerife's Teide volcano, and just below the familiar stars of the Big Dipper on the northern sky. A likely source of the dust stream that produces Quadrantid meteors was identified in 2003 as an asteroid. Look carefully and you can also spot a small, telltale greenish coma above the volcanic peak and near the top of the frame. That's the 2018 Christmas visitor to planet Earth's skies, Comet Wirtanen.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190109.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 

Nasa spacecraft spots gaseous planet 23 times the size of Earth | Science | The Guardian


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jan/08/nasa-spacecraft-planet-earth-tess-mission

#space

 

Nasa spacecraft spots gaseous planet 23 times the size of Earth | Science | The Guardian


https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jan/08/nasa-spacecraft-planet-earth-tess-mission

#space

 
#EugeneBagashov: #Oumuamua Data Reveals Intriguing Possibilities | #Space #News



Today, physicist Eugene Bagashov concludes his remarkable three-part analysis of 'Oumuamua, the mysterious object which is thought to be our solar system’s first interstellar traveler. In previous episodes, Eugene has explored several enigmas, including the puzzle of the object’s mysterious acceleration as it moved away from the Sun. While this episode was in production, Eugene made a stunning discovery that may provide an essential pathway to understanding 'Oumuamua’s trajectory. As Eugene explains, this discovery relates directly to measurements of the interstellar magnetic field.

 

CubeSats joining Hera mission to asteroid system


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

When ESA’s planned Hera mission journeys to its target binary asteroid system, it will not be alone. The spacecraft will carry two tiny CubeSats for deployment around – and eventual landing on – the Didymos asteroids. Each companion spacecraft will be small enough to fit inside a briefcase, as compared to the desk-sized Hera.
posted by pod_feeder

 

2019 preview


#esa #europeanspaceagency #news #science #space

Image/photo

Take a look at what's coming up for the European Space Agency this year
posted by pod_feeder

 
Random image from the archives

APOD: 2013 October 3 - M106 Close Up




Close to the Great Bear (Ursa Major) and surrounded by the stars of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici), this celestial wonder was discovered in 1781 by the metric French astronomer Pierre Mechain. Later, it was added to the catalog of his friend and colleague Charles Messier as M106. Modern deep telescopic views reveal it to be an island universe: a spiral galaxy around 30 thousand light-years across located only about 21 million light-years beyond the stars of the Milky Way. Along with prominent dust lanes and a bright central core, this colorful composite image highlights youthful blue star clusters and reddish stellar nurseries that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. The high resolution galaxy portrait is a mosaic of data from Hubble's sharp ACS camera combined with groundbased color image data. M106 (aka NGC 4258) is a nearby example of the Seyfert class of active galaxies, seen across the spectrum from radio to X-rays. Energetic active galaxies are powered by matter falling into a massive central black hole.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131003.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
Random image from the archives

APOD: 2013 October 3 - M106 Close Up




Close to the Great Bear (Ursa Major) and surrounded by the stars of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici), this celestial wonder was discovered in 1781 by the metric French astronomer Pierre Mechain. Later, it was added to the catalog of his friend and colleague Charles Messier as M106. Modern deep telescopic views reveal it to be an island universe: a spiral galaxy around 30 thousand light-years across located only about 21 million light-years beyond the stars of the Milky Way. Along with prominent dust lanes and a bright central core, this colorful composite image highlights youthful blue star clusters and reddish stellar nurseries that trace the galaxy's spiral arms. The high resolution galaxy portrait is a mosaic of data from Hubble's sharp ACS camera combined with groundbased color image data. M106 (aka NGC 4258) is a nearby example of the Seyfert class of active galaxies, seen across the spectrum from radio to X-rays. Energetic active galaxies are powered by matter falling into a massive central black hole.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131003.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
Image/photo

The Data Tape Recorders (DTR) on Voyager 1 and 2

The DTRs in both spacecraft performed flawlessly from their launch in 1977 and through the entire Grand Tour mission, as well as the extended mission that set both vehicles on a course out of the solar system.

Data storage was specified that could buffer about 536 Mb, or the equivalent of 100 full-resolution photographs from the spacecraft’s camera.

It appears that none of the non-flown DTRs exist in any museum collections any more, and all we have is one picture of the mechanism. It’s clearly much more sophisticated than the standard 8-track cartridge transport for consumer use at the time.

In 2007, the DTR in Voyager 1 was shut down for good, not due to any issues with the unit, but because of the dwindling supply of power coming from the craft’s radioisotope thermal generators ... the DTR in Voyager 2 is still working, but is likely to be shut down as the power wanes in that vehicle.

Soon we’ll lose contact with both of these platforms for good, and they’ll pass silently into the interstellar void.
#science #engineering #space #exploration #voyager #data #tape #storage

 
Random image from the archives

APOD: January 21, 1996 - Mercury's Faults

Image/photo

The surface of the planet Mercury is not without fault. In this case, however, "fault" refers to unusual surface features that are the topic of much speculation. The above fault line is called Santa Maria Rupes, and runs through many prominent craters. The meandering feature is thought to be the result of huge forces of compression on Mercury's surface. Such rupes probably originate from large impacts and a general shrinking of Mercury's crust, which in turn causes parts of the crust to push above other parts.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap960121.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
Random image from the archives

APOD: January 21, 1996 - Mercury's Faults

Image/photo

The surface of the planet Mercury is not without fault. In this case, however, "fault" refers to unusual surface features that are the topic of much speculation. The above fault line is called Santa Maria Rupes, and runs through many prominent craters. The meandering feature is thought to be the result of huge forces of compression on Mercury's surface. Such rupes probably originate from large impacts and a general shrinking of Mercury's crust, which in turn causes parts of the crust to push above other parts.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap960121.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
RT @AlanStern: Want to know more about @NewHorizons2015 and the Ultima flyby? FEAST on this, fact sheets and our press kit at https://t.co/bXexxxdKk7 #Space #NASA #SCIENCE #UltimaFlyby #UltimaThule https://t.co/nYZ8lDy57e
"Minkorret Ultras" #UltimaThule”

 
RT @AlanStern: Want to know more about @NewHorizons2015 and the Ultima flyby? FEAST on this, fact sheets and our press kit at https://t.co/bXexxxdKk7 #Space #NASA #SCIENCE #UltimaFlyby #UltimaThule https://t.co/nYZ8lDy57e
"Minkorret Ultras" #UltimaThule”

 
Image/photo
Dr. James O’Donoghue shows the rotation periods & axial tilts of the eight largest planets in our solar system in the gif.
(NASA imagery was used)

HD Download for educators etc:
(link: https://tinyurl.com/y85u2ev7) tinyurl.com/y85u2ev7

#SolarSystem #Space

 
Alan Stern speaks just before the New Horizons encounter with Ultima Thule.



The New Horizons spacecraft is healthy and on final approach to the first close-up exploration of a Kuiper Belt object in history, and the farthest exploration of any world, ever.

In just a few days, on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, New Horizons will swoop three times closer to our target—2014 MU69 (nicknamed Ultima Thule)—than we flew past Pluto. The anticipation is palpable now: we are on the verge of an important scientific exploration almost 20 years in the making and, in many ways, unlike any other ever attempted.

I'm writing this just days before the New Horizons flyby of "Ultima," and will be my last until the flyby is completed. The pace of activity here at mission control at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is intense. Mission operations, encounter operations, navigation operations, and science team efforts are all proceeding in parallel, along with an increasing pace of public affairs and engagement activities
#Exploration #Space #Pluto #NewHorizons #UltimaThule

 
Alan Stern speaks just before the New Horizons encounter with Ultima Thule.



The New Horizons spacecraft is healthy and on final approach to the first close-up exploration of a Kuiper Belt object in history, and the farthest exploration of any world, ever.

In just a few days, on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, New Horizons will swoop three times closer to our target—2014 MU69 (nicknamed Ultima Thule)—than we flew past Pluto. The anticipation is palpable now: we are on the verge of an important scientific exploration almost 20 years in the making and, in many ways, unlike any other ever attempted.

I'm writing this just days before the New Horizons flyby of "Ultima," and will be my last until the flyby is completed. The pace of activity here at mission control at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory is intense. Mission operations, encounter operations, navigation operations, and science team efforts are all proceeding in parallel, along with an increasing pace of public affairs and engagement activities
#Exploration #Space #Pluto #NewHorizons #UltimaThule

 
APOD: 2018 December 28 - NGC 1365: Majestic Island Universe




Barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is truly a majestic island universe some 200,000 light-years across. Located a mere 60 million light-years away toward the chemical constellation Fornax, NGC 1365 is a dominant member of the well-studied Fornax galaxy cluster. This impressively sharp color image shows intense star forming regions at the ends of the bar and along the spiral arms, and details of dust lanes cutting across the galaxy's bright core. At the core lies a supermassive black hole. Astronomers think NGC 1365's prominent bar plays a crucial role in the galaxy's evolution, drawing gas and dust into a star-forming maelstrom and ultimately feeding material into the central black hole.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181228.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
APOD: 2018 December 28 - NGC 1365: Majestic Island Universe




Barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is truly a majestic island universe some 200,000 light-years across. Located a mere 60 million light-years away toward the chemical constellation Fornax, NGC 1365 is a dominant member of the well-studied Fornax galaxy cluster. This impressively sharp color image shows intense star forming regions at the ends of the bar and along the spiral arms, and details of dust lanes cutting across the galaxy's bright core. At the core lies a supermassive black hole. Astronomers think NGC 1365's prominent bar plays a crucial role in the galaxy's evolution, drawing gas and dust into a star-forming maelstrom and ultimately feeding material into the central black hole.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181228.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD

 
APOD: 2018 December 28 - NGC 1365: Majestic Island Universe




Barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is truly a majestic island universe some 200,000 light-years across. Located a mere 60 million light-years away toward the chemical constellation Fornax, NGC 1365 is a dominant member of the well-studied Fornax galaxy cluster. This impressively sharp color image shows intense star forming regions at the ends of the bar and along the spiral arms, and details of dust lanes cutting across the galaxy's bright core. At the core lies a supermassive black hole. Astronomers think NGC 1365's prominent bar plays a crucial role in the galaxy's evolution, drawing gas and dust into a star-forming maelstrom and ultimately feeding material into the central black hole.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181228.html

\#astronomy #picture #space #NASA #APOD